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Mixing Systems, Inc. is a global leader in providing jet mixing systems across many industries and applications. A unique and key advantage of jet mixing—which operates based on the eductor principle—is that there are no moving or rotating components within the tank that is being mixed, thereby allowing for much easier operation and maintenance (O&M) than other types of mixers or agitators. Additionally, jet mixing systems are preferred and especially cost-effective for large (10,000+ gallon) or deep tank applications.

Mixing Systems, Inc.’s jet mixing systems are comprised of two major components:

  1. Mixing manifolds located within the tank with entrainment openings on the jet nozzles
  2. Recirculation pumps that pull liquid from the tank and hydraulically pump it back through the mixing manifolds at our designed operating levels.

Components of a jet mixing system Mixing Systems Inc

There are numerous considerations that go into designing a jet mixing system based on the application, materials being mixed and their unique attributes, tank layout and volume, total holding time, required tank turnovers, energy constraints, etc. Our jet mixers are used in many wastewater treatment applications, as well as within the mining, oil and petrochemical, food/agriculture, and chemical manufacturing industries for a variety of processing, blending, or solids suspension needs. Please contact us to find out if our jet mixing systems may be suitable for your large volume mixing application. 

 

computational fluid dynamics simluation

 

Mixing Systems, Inc. can conduct custom mixing analyses based upon the material characteristics and range of design conditions specified using our computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling software.

 

Example Videos Displaying Jet Mixing in Operation

This storm holding tank at a plant in Ohio makes use of a jet mixer which creates a vacuum that entrains additional liquid between the inner and outer nozzles. The flow at the end of the flange shows the liquid being entrained between the inner and outer nozzles.

We made a video animation about entrainment: https://youtu.be/vfHPFcXnOWg

 

This eddy jet mixer is shown during the start-up process. The mixer is located in a digestor tank and is designed to be operated as an anaerobic or aerobic digestor. Solids concentration can vary up to 4%.

This is a two-step activated sludge system treating wastewater in Houston, Texas. The first step uses five circular tanks to treat the concentrated waste. The second step (shown in this video) has seven rectangular tanks to further reduce the concentration of the influent wastewater using bidirectional jet aerators.

More air is used for the front end of the aeration tank, where the concentration is high. The rear end of the aeration tank is for maintaining dissolved oxygen, as well as treating the remaining load.

This flow equalization tank holds storm water at a plant in Ohio and is mixed with no air. You can distinctly see the jet plumes that mix the tank and keep solids in suspension. The liquid level varies from 5 to 25 feet.

 

This flow equalization tank holds storm water at a plant in Ohio and is mixed with no air. You can distinctly see the jet plumes that mix the tank and keep solids in suspension. The liquid level varies from 5 to 25 feet.

This is anaerobic sludge being mixed in a circular tank, using an eddy jet mixer. Eddy mixers are typically used in sludge storage tanks and anaerobic digestors. Usually, eddy mixers are used in systems with liquid levels between 5 and 30 feet.

This 5 million gallon flow equalization tank at a plant in Ohio is designed to treat storm wastewater. The tank has a sloped bottom and uses one submersible pump on the exterior of the tank. The jet mixer has four arms which are all supplied by one 90-HP pump.

The system can be operated with the liquid below the nozzles or up to the top liquid level of the tank, as long as the liquid level above the pump is greater than 3 feet. The system shows equal liquid level distribution throughout the tank.

 




This aerobic digestor in Ohio is being mixed during start-up with clean water. Currently only the pump is in operation, showing the mixing action of the recirculation pump and the jet mixer with no aeration.